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Achillea (Yarrow)
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Including Achillea varieties Marmalade, Inca Gold, Coronation Gold, Alabaster, and Aurea

Achillea

Achillea

Yarrow

Legend has it that Achilles used this plant to heal his soldiers’ wounds after battle. As a folk remedy, its leaves are prescribed to soothe abrasions and toothache. We find this sturdy, dependable plant the perfect remedy for many design situations. The broad, flat flower heads enhance horizontal elements, their colors blending with other perennials. Spicy smelling, fernlike foliage and strong straight stems add to overall attractiveness. Spreading and drought tolerant, Yarrow seems to thrive on neglect, can handle ocean spray and will bloom again in the fall if cut back in midsummer.

View a slideshow of plant images from this genus


Achillea ‘Alabaster’  full sun

Named for the ivory-white color that the pale yellow flowers turn with age, ‘Alabaster’ blooms late and, with dried seed heads, keeps our interest well into winter. Its form is stiff and upright and its foliage gray-green, making an excellent neighbor for Aster ‘Little Carlow’ or grasses such as Miscanthus sinensis ‘Nippon’.

Blooms August–October.

Size: 2-1/2' high x 2' wide; hardy to zone 4.

Achillea ‘Alabaster’ (p-0239)
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Achillea x ‘Coronation Gold’  full sun
Achillea  Coronation Gold

Throughout the summer, gray-green filigree textured foliage anticipates the autumn reveille. Planted in drifts, the flower heads, composed of tight clusters of tiny florets, form bold slabs of gold, a timely reflection of the harvest moon. Contrast this tall growing Yarrow with Eupatorium purpureum.

Blooms June–July.

Size: 3' high x 2' wide; hardy to zone 4.

Achillea x ‘Coronation Gold’ (P-0002)
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Achillea filipendulina ‘Parker’s Variety’  full sun  new plant

A well-loved garden mainstay, this steadfast AGM recipient features dense golden floral plates, rising like harvest moons, on stout upright leafy stems above a handsome pewter green mound of deeply dissected aromatic foliage. Grateful for lean somewhat dry sites, ‘Parker’s Variety’ asserts a regal stature and richly colored corymbs with complimentary accents amid blue flowering neighbors such as Salvia ‘Nekan’ or Agapanthus ‘Storm Cloud’.

Blooms June–August.

Size: 3'–4' high x 18" wide; hardy to zone 3.

Achillea filipendulina ‘Parker’s Variety’ (P-0004)
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Achillea ‘Fireland’  full sun
Achillea  Fireland

With imposing clusters of fire engine red flowers heightened by prominent saffron yellow eyes and a strong, self-supporting stance, this preeminent German-bred Yarrow has a lot to offer.

Arising from airy and finely cut, grayish green foliage, its stiff, upright stems shoulder a fervid fiesta that continues for months as the blooms age to soft apricot and toasty orange shades, then finally to hushed golden tones.

Blooms June–early August.

Size: 2'–3' high x 2' wide; hardy to zone 4.

Achillea ‘Fireland’ (p-0873)
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Achillea ‘Hella Glashoff’  full sun

In clear creamy lemon hues, the large flattened umbels are lifted on short and sturdy leafy stems above a lacelike delicacy of green foliage. Later to bloom and not as tall as most of our other Achillea offerings, this softly colored AGM winner is an exemplary choice for smaller gardens, given border frontage and Aster ‘Lutetia’ as a companion.

Blooms September–early November.

Size: 12" high x 15" wide; hardy to zone 4.

Achillea ‘Hella Glashoff’ (P-1238)
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Achillea ‘Hoffnung’  full sun
Achillea  Hoffnung

We are proud to offer this stalwart old favorite. For years, ‘Hoffnung’ has proven itself to be a strong performer, faithfully producing fine textured, feathery green, millefolium foliage and apricot-colored flowers that fade to a sandstone buff. Pair it with Lavandula ‘Imperial Gem’ for complementary bloom color.

Blooms July–September.

Size: 2' high x 2' wide; hardy to zone 4.

Achillea ‘Hoffnung’ (p-0629)
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Achillea ‘Inca Gold’  full sun
Achillea  Inca Gold Achillea  Inca Gold

This truly architectural Yarrow blooms on three different levels. Flowers, ranging in color from rust to sandstone, blossom from terracotta buds at 16, 24 and 30 in. amidst a cool backdrop of green fernlike leaves and upright stalks. ‘Inca Gold’ combines well with the dark foliage of Aster ‘Lady in Black’ or the cream-colored flowers of Anthemis ‘Susanna Mitchell’.

Blooms early July–early October.

Size: 3' high x 2' wide; hardy to zone 4.


Achillea ‘Inca Gold’ (p-0501)
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Achillea x kellereri  full sun
Achillea x kellereri

The silver-gray filigree foliage, sturdy, upright flower stalks and abundant yellow-centered white flowers combine to give this attractive hybrid a crisp, refreshing look. Even on our windy coast, it remains steadfast and lively. In the rock garden, en masse, or contrasted with the bronze blades of Stipa arundinacea or the deep green foliage of Dracocephalum ‘Fuji Blue’, this plant will quickly become a favorite.

Blooms May – September.

Size: 8" high x 8" wide; hardy to zone 5.

Achillea x kellereri (P-0173)
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Achillea ‘Marmalade’  full sun
Achillea  Marmalade

Just hearing this new, warm-colored Achillea’s name conjures a sweet and satisfying image. Finely dissected, grayish green foliage offsets paprika-toned buds and thick slices of small, individual old-gold florets. Position ‘Marmalade’ next to Kniphofia ‘Patricia Marrow’ and Nepeta ‘Joanna Reed’ so you can indulge in its rich autumnal shades.

Blooms July–October.

Size: 2-1/2'–3' high x 2' wide; hardy to zone 4.

Achillea ‘Marmalade’ (P-1091)
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Achillea millefolium ‘Pretty Belinda’  full sun

‘Pretty Belinda’ struts lovely flat-topped dense flower clusters in vibrant lilac and pink hues on steady straight stems. Finely incised feather-like foliage cloaks an aromatic tidy green foundation that is more compact, more upright and shorter than most millefolium cultivars. This long summer bloomer won’t need staking, entices butterflies and brings colorful good looks to Lavenders, Geum ‘Mango Lassi’ and Salvia ‘Sweet Esmeralda’.

Blooms June–September.

Size: 18"–2' high x 18"–2' wide; hardy to zone 4.

Achillea millefolium ‘Pretty Belinda’ (P-1738)
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Achillea millefolium ‘Red Velvet’  full sun
Achillea millefolium Red Velvet

Commended as the best of the red Achilleas, this Yarrow’s signature is its splendid horizontal mass of velvet-rich dark rosy red flowers. Tall resilient stalks clad in fine textured gray-green foliage bolster full flashy heads that last all summer and refuse to fade. Dutch bred ‘Red Velvet’ can harmonize with Sanguisorba ‘Red Thunder’ and Monarda ‘Jacob Cline’ for sumptuous color echoes.

Blooms June–September.

Size: 2-1/2' high x 2-1/2' wide; hardy to zone 4.

Achillea millefolium ‘Red Velvet’ (P-1739)
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Achillea ‘Mondpagode’  full sun

For its dense, sizeable heads of elegantly layered, bright creamy white flowers, this sterling Achillea earns the namesake ‘Moon Pagoda’. Never fading to murky grays, the bold display opens from soft yellow buds supported by strong, branching stems and a green base.

Straight-up ‘Mondpagode’ is a highly touted, AGM victor that always behaves, and dignifies the border with Sedum ‘Matrona’ by its side.

Blooms September–October.

Size: 2' high x 2' wide; hardy to zone 4.

Achillea ‘Mondpagode’ (P-1239)
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Achillea ‘Paprika’  full sun
Achillea  Paprika

Just like the seasoning, this vigorous Galaxy hybrid flavors the garden with a distinctively rich, red snappiness. The large flattened heads showcase gilded eyes, their bright rubescent coloring eventually fading to a deep pink hue, while delicate-looking green-gray foliage provides a tidy, composed counterpoint, Persicaria ‘Golden Arrow’ heightens the recipe.

Blooms June–September.

Size: 2' high x 2-1/2' wide; hardy to zone 4.

Achillea ‘Paprika’ (P-1368)
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Achillea ‘Sawa Sawa’  full sun
Achillea  Sawa Sawa

An attractive gray-green foundation of airy, fine textured foliage furnishes russet-tinted buds, which are held in dense, flat flower heads. Eventually paling to soft yellow, the earthy orange hues turn on the heat for Campanula ‘Prichard’s Variety’s cool violet-blues in our garden.

Blooms July–September.

Size: 2-1/2' high x 2' wide; hardy to zone 4.

Achillea ‘Sawa Sawa’ (p-0891)
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Achillea ‘Taygetea (cream form)’  full sun
Achillea  Taygetea (cream form)

Making its way from the Middle East to England in 1640, this refined form first caught our eye at Bernwode Plants, a small nursery in England.Making its way from the Middle East to England in 1640, this refined form first caught our eye at Bernwode Plants, a small nursery in England.

Large finely feathered broad leaves, bathed in hushed silvery greens, compose a sturdy well-groomed clump that looks impeccable all season. Luminous umbels of clustered pale cream flowers bloom later and longer than most Yarrows, affording a welcome place for the eye to rest amid the lush greens and more boisterous blooms associated with summer.

Blooms July–September.

Size: 18" high x 18"–2' wide; hardy to zone 4.

Achillea ‘Taygetea (cream form)’ (P-1684)
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Achillea tomentosa ‘Aurea’  full sun
Dwarf Woolly Yarrow

Woolly, narrow, and finely feathered, small gray-green leaves knit a tidy, low growing mat that is both attractive and extremely drought tolerant. Tightset, flat clusters of perky lemon yellow flowers perch on 6 to 10 in. stems above dense soft-looking foliage. Championed as a choice candidate for clambering about the rockery, filling in small crannies, or edging a path, this tenacious charmer can pal around with Scutellaria ‘Texas Rose’, though it resents hot humid weather.

Blooms June – August.

Size: 6" high x 10" wide; hardy to zone 4.

AVAILABLE DECEMBER 2014

Achillea tomentosa ‘Aurea’ (p-1603)
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Achillea ‘Walther Funcke’  full sun

True to its German heritage, this cross between millefolium and ‘Taygetea’ is strong and sturdy. Its large brick-red flowers contrast beautifully with the gray-green foliage.

Blooms June–August.

Size: 3' high x 2' wide; hardy to zone 4.

Achillea ‘Walther Funcke’ (P-0502)
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Achillea ‘Weser River Sandstone’  full sun
Achillea  Weser River Sandstone

A cozy mélange of buff, creamy rose and deep antique pink distinguishes this lovely cultivar named after the German river that flows to the North Sea. Atop deeply feathered green leaves and staunch stems, the multicolored display is marked by light centered individual florets, lending a feminine flair to companions like Aster ‘Lutetia’ or Eryngium ‘Blaukappe’.

Blooms July – September.

Size: 2' high x 15"–18" wide; hardy to zone 4.

Achillea ‘Weser River Sandstone’ (P-1503)
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Latest News

Straight from the Border
Bring sparkling beauty to your late summer and early fall garden.

By the time August rolls around and the waning days of summer segue into fall, gardens can appear tired and somewhat lackluster. We may find ourselves simply losing interest in our verdant abodes.

Over the years, we’ve discovered a few simple techniques that allow any plantscape to resonate with late-season appeal. For starters, the addition of well-rotted compost and or mulch not only reduces watering requirements throughout the warmer months, but generally makes it easier for plants to stay perky and fresh looking during the dog days of summer. Sometime in early May, you may wish to cut back tall, late blooming perennials that have a tendency to flop or become messy by the time they finally flower. By doing so, they’ll maintain a tidier habit, and when coupled with frequent deadheading many blossoms will keep on coming ‘til the season’s end.

You could include a few specimen shrubs or trees. They serve as strong bones or placeholders, lending an overall pleasing appearance to the landscape, even though some of the perennials or grasses may be spent. White, clear pink or chartreuse-hued flowers tend to forge soothing counterpoints as they effortlessly meld autumn’s cozy parade of warm oranges, reds and yellows. Major stars of the late show, ornamental grasses become poetry in motion during gusty days, while their shimmering inflorescences are set aglow by afternoon sunlight. When designing your outdoor space, it’s important to choose plant’s not only for their flowers, but to consider their seed heads (often important food sources for birds), foliar intrigue, berries, bark and dynamic architecture as well.

We’ve included a sampling of our very favorite plants that promise to inspire your green thumb, heighten your senses and entice you back into the garden for a stellar last hurrah! There’s still enough time to select a couple of new botanical wonders and get a jump start on next spring before winter finally arrives.

Perennials:

  • asarum splendens

    Actaea simplex ‘Atropurpurea’ & Helianthus ‘Sheila’s Sunshine’

    Actaea simplex ‘Atropurpurea’
    Grown from seedlings carefully selected for dark, coppery purple foliage, the regal profile of ‘Atropurpurea’ shows its good breeding. A garden dweller with a staid bearing, its stately reddish purple stems soar above your head, displaying dense spires covered with round mahogany-hued buds and sweet starbursts of white. Echo this Actaea’s somber tones by bringing it together with Angelica gigas, and let the lime green foliage of Physocarpus ‘Dart’s Gold’ brighten the mood. Hardy to zone 4. (P-0049)
  • Asarum splendens
    asarum splendens

    Asarum splendens



    Chinese Wild Ginger
    “Splendid” seems like too modest a word to proclaim the elegance of this ginger’s foliage! glistening, broadly arrow-shaped, deep green leaves flaunt dramatic silver marbling and come spring, 2 in. wide dark purple blossoms with white throats. Situated among Podophyllum hexandrum, easy-to-grow Asarum splendens sculpts a show stealing, illustriously patterned ground cover in just a few years that appreciates warm, humid summers while resenting cool ones. Hardy to zone 6. (p-1247)
  • Aster cordifolius ‘Avondale’
    Blue wood Aster
    Selected from a versatile Aster indigenous to our southeastern mountains, ‘Avondale’ greets fall with a jovial long lasting barrage of small, yellow-eyed pale lavender-blue daisies atop tidy slender green foliage. Acquiescent to varied light, it exhibits an upright open habit in sunny spots and becomes more relaxed and arching in darker recesses. Ignored by deer, but coveted by butterflies, floral arrangers, and gardeners, this floriferous wonder endures dry shade once established, favors well-drained soil and can be planted en masse along woodland fringes, meandering amid Geranium ‘White Ness’. Zone 3/4. (P-1746)
  • Aster lateriflorus ‘White Lovely’
    Calico Aster
    A preeminent star of the fall show, ‘White Lovely’ entertains petite, thin-petaled white daisies tinged lilac when mature and brightened by sunny-side-up yellow eyes. The copious, late summer flowers are borne along horizontally branched leafy sprays of arching and wide-angled, purple-streaked stems with small, slender dark green foliage that never tuckers out. We like to plant Monarda ‘Violet Queen’ and Melianthus ‘Antonow’s Blue’ behind while headlining this elegant Aster right up front. Hardy to zone 4. (P-1366)

    aster jindai and melianthus major

    Aster ‘Jindai’ & Melainthus major

  • Aster tataricus ‘Jindai’
    Dwarf Tatarian Aster
    The name may sound like one of the bad guys from Star Wars, but this unique Aster is definitely on our side with its upright bearing and lush textural appeal. Not as towering as its moisture-loving Asian counterpart, ‘Jindai’ spawns huge serrated rough-to-the-touch leafage on stout shorter stalks and abundant branched sprays of late blooming violet flowers engraved by large saffron eyes. A stand-alone for the mixed border, its assertive look can be juxtaposed against finer textured plants like Spiraea ‘Ogon’ and Phlox ‘David’. Hardy to zone 3. (P-0632)
  • Eupatorium maculatum ‘Riesenschirm’ Regarded as one of the top ten plants of the Dutch wave, favored by bees and butterflies and an AGM winner, this superb back-of-the-border beauty propels polished, tall dark purple stems—stiff, straight and staunch—skyward bound. Loosely arranged whorls of heavily textured deep green tapered leaves anchor fluffy 8 in. wide domed flower heads awash with reddish purple hues. Its lofty architecture maintains a dignified profile, even in winter, enhanced by warm browns and seed heads, which nourish finches and tits. Hardy to zone 4. (P-1754)
  • Filipendula rubra ‘Venusta’
    A statuesque beauty, ‘Venusta’ is distinguished by huge, fluffy cloudlike plumes painted with soft salmon pinks floating above a good-sized, leafy mass of upright stems and jagged, Maple-shaped foliage. Forging an impressive stand in a moist well drained setting, Meadow Sweet seldom needs staking, and makes an airy partner for Trollius ‘ Superbus’. Hardy to zone 4. (P-1024)
  • Helenium ‘Zimbelstern’
    Cymbal Star
    One of the largest flowered Heleniums, ‘Zimbelstern’s undulating, brilliantly golden, mahogany-splashed petals converge at a russet eye. Before its enthusiastic bloom, strong stems sport unusual chartreuse buds that have a joy all their own. Hardy to zone 4. (p-0854)
  • Helenium ‘Red Jewel’
    Saturated with dusky red hues, uniquely shaded petals perform a lavish dance around prominent maroon and saffron hubs. Droves of closely set flowers, some marked by yellow tips, are esteemed for their long blooming period and the consistent color they maintain throughout the season, unlike many other Heleniums. Destined to be a vivacious garden mainstay, this Bob Brown introduction grows as a bushy verdant clump, looks spectacular en masse and can escort perennials like Monarda ‘Jacob Cline’ and Salvia confertiflora for a galvanizing floral affair. Hardy to zone 4. (P-1701)
  • Helianthus giganteus ‘Sheila’s Sunshine’
    Giant Pale Yellow Sunflower
    Late blooming pastel yellow flowers gaze down at onlookers from atop lofty, sturdy stems. Combine with Buddleja ‘Ellen’s Blue’, Calamagrostis ‘Karl Foerster’ and tall, late Asters in the rear of the border. Hardy to zone 6. (p-0461)
  • Kniphofia ‘Yellow Cheer’
    Bolstered by hefty, tall and straight asparagus-hued stalks, dense yellowish orange buds, infused with chartreuse, remind us of miniature Christmas trees. Radiant yellows, pumpkin colors and lime tinges meld an unparalleled luminosity as the gorgeous torches stand sentinel, their plump rounded bases tapering to blunt tips well above a bright green, upright clump of strapping, deeply furrowed lax leaves. A robust specimen for the fall garden, ‘Yellow Cheer’s late season effervescence steals the show, especially when staged against a dark green foil. Hardy to zone 8. (p-1458)
  • leontis

    Leonotis menthifolia ‘Savannah Sunset’

    Leonotis menthifolia ‘Savannah Sunset’
    Lion’s Tail
    Conjuring images of romping safari lions, wondrous dense whorls of furry bright orange tubular flowers ascend straight lofty stalks in spaced intervals. New growth emerges from the blossom’s center, crafting an unusual tiered effect, while freely branching square hairy stems sprout neatly paired triangular green leaves that are narrow and toothed. Majestic as a container specimen or a mixed border focal point, this easy-to-grow South African mint family member favors a sunny well-drained spot with average moisture and a hard cut back after frosty winters. Hardy to zone 8. (P-1657)
  • Origanum ‘Bristol Cross’
    Assuming an air of refinement, the very slender blooms feature small, deep rose and chartreuse bracts that resemble decorative braids. Tipped with tiny purple flowers, the clustered bracts are held at nearly right angles to upright and reddish leafy stems. Grounded by medium green foliage, this long lasting, delicate floral display casts earthy yet saturated hues in the border or an arrangement. Shown in the middle with Hypericum androsaemum to the left. Hardy to zone 6. (p-1277)
    origanum, persicaria, hypericum

    Hypericum androsaseum to the left with Euphorbia ‘Excalibur’ behind & Persicaria ‘Summer Dance’ back right;
    low growing Origanum ‘Bristol Cross’ (middle, to the right of the Hypericum)

  • Persicaria amplexicaulis ‘Summer Dance’
    With foliage that’s close to lime-green, and spiky floral tails that approach the scarlet spectrum of rosy pink, this slow spreading perennial is sure to please. We brought ‘Summer Dance’ home from Piet Oudolf’s Dutch nursery and have come to appreciate its brighter, less rambunctious nature. Swaying to a late summer breeze, our stand lives up to its name while cheerfully commingling amid Anemone ‘Andrea Atkinson’ in the border. Zone 5/6. (P-1312)
    rudbeckia

    Rudbeckia ’Praire Glow’, Helenium ‘Zimbelstern’ & Helenium ‘Red Jewel’ on the right

  • Rudbeckia triloba ‘Prairie Glow’
    Spangled with burgundy, bronze and reddish orange shades, irresistible legions of ebullient long blooming daisies parade dark chocolate centers and bicolor gold-tipped petals. At the base, large trilobed verdant leaves form a handsome bushy mass that gives way to upper, narrower leaves and openly branched, erect purple flowering stems. A denizen of the Great Plains, this summertime showstopper is not as long-lived as other Rudbeckias; it eventually wears out, but easily reseeds. Hardy to zone 3. (P-1713)
  • Sanguisorba officinalis ‘Red Thunder’
    Derived from a Korean collection of Sanguisorba officinalis, this high-fashion Sanguisorba was selected by Dutch plantsman Piet Oudolf for its deep ruby-red bobbles, perched on tall stiffer stems. Whether in the border or a meadow planting, a bouquet or frost-covered in the garden’s winter light, their distinctive silhouette inspires as much drama as a gathering thunderhead. A bluish green bed of pinnate foliage with toothed leaflets launches the strong floral display that can be superimposed against lofty silvery plumed Miscanthus, whorled Veronicastrum blooms and Helianthus ‘Capenoch Star’. Hardy to zone 4. (P-1542)
  • Sedum telephium ‘Red Cauli’
    A vibrant carousel of color and a neat compact visage earned this popular Sedum the RHS Garden Merit award in 2006 and a place in our border. Flashy cardinal-hued arching stems and notched blue-green succulent leaves with purple tinges elevate pale rosy buds and bright pink clustered flowers, which age to a dark ruby red. Let ‘Red Cauli’ festoon a patio container or a pathway’s edge, accompanying other late blooming companions such as Salvia reptans West Texas Form and Calamagrostis foliosa. Zone 3/4. (P-1716)
    sedum and salvia

    Salvia ‘Limelight’ & Sedum ‘Red Cauli’

  • Salvia mexicana ‘Limelight’
    Whorls of densely packed, chartreuse terminal buds on strong upright stems provide exciting contrast to the lush green color of ‘Limelight’s foliage. In flower, this cultivar is sure to take center stage as deep bluish purple blooms peek out from the vibrant yellow-green calyxes. Cut back each season to encourage new growth at the base and to maintain a pleasing shape. Hardy to zone 8. (p-0608)
  • Tricyrtis lasiocarpa
    Amethyst Toad Lily
    A favored standout among Tricyrtis, this exceptional species sprouts an attractive tightset clump of sturdy erect arching stems garbed with glistening green and purple freckled alternating leaves. Amethyst and blue petal tips embellish white upward facing orchid-style blooms that populate large well-branched terminal sprays. Hailing from Taiwan, where it has been observed growing in nearly full sun, Amethyst Toad Lily’s lovely long blooming flowers can model their ornate features in a brighter garden bed. Hardy to zone 7. (P-0271)

Grasses

  • Andropogon gerardii
    Big Bluestem
    Historically renowned as the sod our ancestors broke their backs busting, Big Bluestem is the most widespread of all the prairie grasses. Its regal and wild color show makes it a must in our garden. Growing to great size, the stand’s lush, blue-blushed summer greenery becomes a burgundy and copper glory at first frost. Soaring three-pronged red seed heads beg its other common name, Turkeyfoot. Reliable, heat tolerant and sturdy, Andropogon gerardii thrives in poorly drained clay to dry sandy soils, and easily transitions the outskirts of your garden into the wild meadow beyond. Hardy to zone 4. (g-0448)
  • Eragrostis chloromelas
    Blue Lovegrass
    Witness the ethereal haze of sheer amber-colored panicles floating on lax 3 ft. stalks over long fine cut powdery blue blades and you’ll see why we love this gorgeous South African denizen. The flowing warm season mound spreads slowly over time, while the gauzy inflorescences tantalize birds, butterflies and the rest of us through early winter. Appreciative of fast draining locations, Blue Lovegrass makes a sterling drought tolerant specimen or mass planting. Flank with Pennisetum spathiolatum and tall Molinias, and intersperse Sanguisorba ’Chocolate Tip’ or Aster ’Blue Danube’ for a spectacular painterly effect. Zone 6/7. (G-0540)
  • Molinia caerulea ssp. arundinacea ‘Bergfreund’
    Invite this “friend of the mountain” into your garden bed and it will quickly become your friend as well. Dynamic yet not too imposing, a gauzy array of gently pendulous, rich-colored reddish purple panicles mingle on dark green upright stems. Handsome foliage forms a low green stage that radiates yellow hues in autumn. Studded with ricelike beads transmuting warm chestnut hues when mature, the airy plumes should be headlined right up front where they become a mysterious veil that you can peer through. Hardy to zone 4. (G-0489)
  • Pennisetum spathiolatum
    Slender Veldt Grass
    A denizen of South Africa, this drought tolerant evergreen grass has low growing, narrow dark green blades that provide a verdant contrast to its tawny colored tapers. The dense, abundantly produced inflorescences hover on jointed nearly invisible stems, some 2 to 3 ft. tall, while fashioning a delightful see-through veil. Especially mesmerizing when grouped in a dry creek bed, a meadow or a water wise garden, the Slender Veldt Grass asks only for a well drained abode. Zone 6/7. (G-0511)

Shrubs

  • Cornus capitata
    Evergreen Dogwood
    An elegant, large evergreen shrub or small tree, this slow growing Dogwood is a perfect anchor for the shrubby border. Handsome, curved leathery leaves with light green veins provide a pleasing texture and turn bronze in the winter months. Buttonlike flower heads surrounded by creamy yellow bracts precede the long lasting, prominent, pinkish red strawberry-shaped fruit that appears in November and can be brought inside as a colorful complement to holiday greenery. Hardy to zone 8. (S-0364)
    cotinus and persicaria

    Persicaria ‘Summer Dance’ & Cotinus ‘Grace’

  • Cotinus ‘Grace’
    Smoke Bush
    An arresting beacon as the sun casts a ruby glow through its purple-black leaves, ‘Grace’ inherits her elegance from Cotinus coggygria ‘Velvet Cloak’ and Cotinus obovatus. The sprays of tiny deep pink flowers throw a smoky, wine-colored fog over its robust form, and a close glance reveals bright yellow at the center of each bloom. Lovely in contrast with the silver foliage of Teucrium fruticans (Select Form), ‘Grace’ conveys a stately presence matched by few other plants. Hardy to zone 5. (S-0394)
  • hydrangea ruby slippers

    Hydrangea quercifolia ‘Ruby Slippers’


    Hydrangea quercifolia ‘Ruby Slippers’
    Easily slipped into a diminutive spot, this compelling smaller-statured beauty sprung from a 1998 U.S. National Arboretum cross between ‘Snow Queen’ and ‘Pee Wee’. Exceptional 9 in. upright flowers, which open white but quickly transmute pale pink and eventually deeper rose hues, dress up a more petite, compact rounded carriage. Broad, lobed deciduous leaves are dark green in summer and mahogany tinted come autumn. A peerless companion for fine textured plants such as Spiraea ‘Ogon’ or Sarcococca hookeriana var. humilis, ‘Ruby Slippers’s lovely low profile can be ushered to the foreground, planted en masse or utilized as a hedge. Hardy to zone 5. (S-0766)
  • Hydrangea paniculata ‘Unique’
    Left to its own designs, this vigorous Hydrangea has a natural upright and arching form, but it also responds well to pruning, making ‘Unique’ an effective choice where space is scarce. The immense flower heads are spectacular and abundant, and true to name are unique in shape, being quite broad at the base and bluntly rounded at the tip. They begin the season a creamy white and gradually darken to a buff pink. Hardy to zone 3. (s-0348)
    hydrangea unique

    Hydrangea paniculata ‘Unique’

Trees & Vines

  • Clematis terniflora
    Sweet Autumn Clematis
    This spectacular New Zealand native is covered with small white flowers borne on long, arching panicles. The pink anthers, silky seed heads, and dark glossy leaves combine with the Hawthorn-like fragrance of the flowers to create a sensuous, alluring effect. We trained our Sweet Autumn Clematis to grow horizontally against a wall, so that the evergreen foliage contrasts with the hanging flower panicles. Hardy to zone 6. (T-0108)
  • Parrotia persica
    F. W. Parrot, who made the first ascent of Mt. Ararat in 1829, lends his name to this low branched, round headed, deciduous Persian native with tremendous landscape value. In spring, the silver, green and cream-colored smooth bark is complemented by lustrous green foliage and in autumn it’s highlighted by exquisite gold, rosy pink and crimson tones. Later, showy red stamens and wooly brown bracts create a reddish haze around bare limbs, making a virtual carousel of color and texture. Pest free Persian Ironwood prefers well drained soil and detests both overly wet or dry conditions. Grows moderately. 10’ in 6–8 yrs. Hardy to zone 5. (T-0016)

Current Staff’s Favorite Plant

staff favorite plant

This week the hummingbirds picked our favorite plant! We love it as well because of it’s colorful two-toned effect. Salvia guaranitica ‘Black and Blue’ This eye catching Salvia offers abundant, deep cobalt blue, tubular blooms and nearly black calyxes on 15 in. terminal flowering spikes all summer long. More compact than many of the guaranitica species, ‘Black and Blue’ provides complementary color for the shining blooms of Crocosmia ‘Star of the East’. (P-0772)

More news, events, and favorite plants


Customer Comment:

“I received my order yesterday, and I wanted you to know that everything looks wonderful.  All the plants were a good size and healthy.  I really appreciate that you sent it so quickly and that you have everything in stock that I was looking for.  I will definitely order from you folks again.”

~Debbie in Ohio


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