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Campanula (Bellflower)
at Digging Dog

Including Campanula sarmatica, Campanula takesimana, Campanula poscharskyana, Campanula lactiflora, and Campanula garganica

Campanula

Bellflower

The definitive bellflower, Campanulas melt your heart as they ring in the summer. The genus includes nearly 300 species, from dainty miniatures to stalwart uprights; we can’t resist using them in almost every garden design. Campanulas prefer filtered sun inland, full sun on the coast.

View a slideshow of plant images from this genus


Campanula alliariifolia  full sun  partial shade
Ivory Bells
Campanula alliariifolia

Highly touted by Graham Stuart Thomas, who once referred to it as a “picture of poise and beauty,” this vigorous, clump-forming Campanula hosts a multitude of imposing one-sided spires, densely set with creamy white bells from top to bottom. The 2 in., nodding blooms sport prominent calyxes and elegantly illuminate the handsome, long-petioled heart-shaped foliage below.

Blooms July–August.

Size: 18"–2' high x 18" wide; hardy to zone 4.

Campanula alliariifolia (P-1311)
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Campanula ‘Birch Hybrid’  full sun  partial shade
Campanula  Birch Hybrid

In light of the notion that “new” is not always better, there’s nothing like welcoming back a hard working old friend. Large showy lavender-blue bells flower freely, nodding on graceful 8 in. stems above tidy low mounds of toothed, crisp green foliage. Visually cooling brickwork, small rocks or stone paving in bright sunny spots, this carefree Campanula can be paired with Dianthus ‘Charles Musgrave’ or pink flowering Saponaria x oliviana.

Blooms June–August.

Size: 6" high x 15" wide; hardy to zone 5.

Campanula ‘Birch Hybrid’ (P-0042)
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Campanula carpatica var. turbinata  full sun
Campanula carpatica var. turbinata

All the way from the Carpathian Mountains comes this lively Campanula with winsome mounds of saw-toothed bright green foliage. A profusion of cup-shaped, papery blue flowers face the sky and embellish any rock garden or border.

Blooms late July–September.

Size: 6" high x 12" wide; hardy to zone 4.

Campanula carpatica var. turbinata (P-0043)
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Campanula garganica ‘Dickson’s Gold’  partial shade
Campanula garganica Dickson’s Gold

Cool your summer garden with the fresh colors of spring. In partial shade, the vibrant golden foliage and plentiful clear-water blue flowers of ‘Dickson’s Gold’ will literally glow with life. For even more delectable blue, plant with Salvia forsskaolii in the rockery or along a wall.

Blooms June–August.

Size: 6" high x 20" wide; hardy to zone 6.

Campanula garganica ‘Dickson’s Gold’ (P-0188)
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Campanula glomerata ‘Caroline’  full sun  partial shade  new plant
Clustered Bellflower
Campanula glomerata Caroline

Featured in lovely rounded heads, showy pastel-hued flowers surmount stocky upright stems loosely attired with small sessile leaves. Each long lasting cluster houses up to 15 small blooms, described by deep mauve tips, aged pale blushed petals and newer more saturated amethyst pink ones for a distinctive two-toned effect. Large long-petioled foliage—hairy, toothed, and ovate-shaped— form a verdant slowly spreading basal clump that relishes even moisture and exhibits more heat tolerance than most glomerata species. Rarely offered and easily cultivated, ‘Caroline’ can be associated with pink blooming Persicaria ‘Dimity’.

Blooms June–August.

Size: 12"–18" high x 18" wide; hardy to zone 3.


Campanula glomerata ‘Caroline’ (P-1796)
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Campanula ‘Kent Belle’  full sun

Large, waxy dark violet-blue flowers hang like lanterns on 3 to 4 ft. stems above glossy basal foliage. We plant this quick colonizing offspring of Campanula takesimana among other vigorous perennials such as Kniphofia ‘Bressingham Sunbeam’ at the front of the border.

Blooms June–October.

Size: 3'–4' high x 2' wide; hardy to zone 5.

Campanula ‘Kent Belle’ (P-0510)
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Campanula lactiflora ‘Loddon Anna’  full sun
Campanula lactiflora Loddon Anna Campanula lactiflora Loddon Anna

Blowsy branching heads of soft pink bellflowers crown sturdy stems lined in pointed leaves, and with Boltonia ‘Snowbank’ nearby create a perfect duet for harmony and support. We love this plant just as much in winter when we pull back the mulch to see its crisp, fleshy white buds slumbering away the cold months.

Blooms August–September.

Size: 3'–4' high x 2' wide; hardy to zone 4.


Campanula lactiflora ‘Loddon Anna’ (P-0044)
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Campanula lactiflora ‘Prichard’s Variety’  full sun
Campanula lactiflora Prichard’s Variety

‘Prichard’s Variety’ is really quite a beauty, a classic border plant distinguished by an elegant profile. Abundant large, dome-shaped clusters of vibrant violet-blue flowers, brightened by a white center, crown the stout, branching stalks and verdant leaves.

Saponaria ‘Max Frei’ is a lively companion for this Campanula’s flowers and Achillea ‘Fireland’ adds warm red tones.

Blooms mid-July–September.

Size: 3'–4' high x 3' wide; hardy to zone 4.

AVAILABLE NOVEMBER 2014

Campanula lactiflora ‘Prichard’s Variety’ (P-0830)
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Campanula lactiflora ‘White Pouffe’  full sun  partial shade

A diminutive leafy mound of soft-looking fresh greenery with toothed margins cushions enchanting outward facing pure white, clustered bell flowers that bees and hummingbirds adore. Selected by revered plantsman Alan Bloom, ‘White Pouffe’s well-groomed compact character can be easily nestled into the frontlines of a border or atop a wall next to Phlox ‘Mini Pearl’ for foliar contrast and pearl-hued blooms.

Blooms June–August.

Size: 12"–15" high x 15"–18" wide; hardy to zone 4.

Campanula lactiflora ‘White Pouffe’ (P-1784)
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Campanula latiloba ‘Alba’  full sun  partial shade
Campanula latiloba Alba

This elegant Campanula forms a tidy mound of deep green evergreen rosettes that hugs the ground. Stiff, flowering stems, in no need of staking, rise midsummer, displaying a multitude of ridged, creamy chartreuse buds. The abundant, snow-white, star-shaped flowers, each accented by three curled white anthers, are perfect for the white garden, especially against Phlox ‘David’.

Blooms July–August.

Size: 2-1/2' high x 2' wide; hardy to zone 5.


Campanula latiloba ‘Alba’ (p-0187)
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Campanula poscharskyana ‘Blue Waterfall’  full sun  partial shade
Serbian Bellflower
Campanula poscharskyana Blue Waterfall

A cascading river of blue-violet, star-shaped blooms emanates from this low-to the-ground, vigorous beauty. Opening from pointy ribbed buds, each soothing, cool-colored flower is highlighted by a subtle white eye, amid good-looking toothed foliage that is darker and more tidy than the species. ‘Blue Waterfall’ is tailor-made for tumbling over walls or creeping along steps, can handle some drought once established and is basically trouble free. (pp#13161)

Blooms June–October.

Size: 8"–10" high x 2' wide; hardy to zone 4.

Campanula poscharskyana ‘Blue Waterfall’ (P-1310)
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Campanula poscharskyana ‘E. H. Frost’  full sun  partial shade

This pre-glasnost Yugoslav émigré is a deservedly popular ground cover. Starry sprays of frosty white bells cover a low mat that can venture over walls or colonize a rock garden.

Blooms May–July.

Size: 8" high x 18" wide; hardy to zone 4.

Campanula poscharskyana ‘E. H. Frost’ (p-0046)
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Campanula poscharskyana ‘Stella’  full sun  partial shade

This favorite of ours conjures images of a brilliant sky. The star-shaped blue-violet flowers open to reveal a white center that contrasts sharply with the deep green foliage. In a crevice or trailing over a rock wall with Geum ‘Beech House Apricot’, ‘Stella’s colors will contrast stellarly.

Blooms June – September.

Size: 6"–8" high x 20" wide; hardy to zone 4.

Campanula poscharskyana ‘Stella’ (P-0512)
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Campanula punctata ‘Cherry Bells’  full sun  partial shade

Not one person has passed by this plant in our garden without stopping to admire its extraordinary bell-shaped cherry-red flowers, which are neatly edged in white. Brightened by pale, purple-spotted throats, they can extend over 3 in. If the timing is right, onlookers will also notice the unusual ridged buds, fastened by long, narrow green calyxes. The ample-sized, pendulous blooms and buds are especially striking against the backdrop of somewhat triangular, serrated green leaves.

Blooms July–mid-October.

Size: 20"–2' high x 2' wide; hardy to zone 5.

Campanula punctata ‘Cherry Bells’ (P-0790)
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Campanula ‘Sarastro’  full sun
Sarastro Bellflower

It’s hard to imagine how on earth ‘Kent Bells’ could be improved upon but that’s exactly what happened when this first-rate Campanula punctata and trachelium hybrid was introduced. Not as tall, more compact and slow to spread are all good reasons why ‘Sarastro’ should be invited into your garden, but then add glistening 2 in. dark violet-blue bells and it becomes simply indispensable.

Named for the Austrian nursery where it originated, this exceptional Bellflower boasts sturdy, 20 in. spikes laden with floral pendants that don’t need staking, and look downright gorgeous alongside yellow flowering Centaurea ruthenica.

Blooms June–August.

Size: 18"–20" high x 18"–2' wide; hardy to zone 4.

Campanula ‘Sarastro’ (P-1309)
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Campanula sarmatica  full sun
Campanula sarmatica

Gracing American gardens since the 1800s, this rarely offered, endangered Campanula fashions an attractive gray-green rosette of crinkled, arrow-shaped leaves, each with a rounded base, a somewhat fuzzy surface and long petioles. The dainty floriferous display of soft blue, flared bells borne on one-sided, upright racemes belies its rugged character.

A sun tolerant, clumping perennial, Campanula sarmatica’s quiet charm can be admired along a border’s edge or atop a wall accompanying Diascia ‘Coral Canyon’.

Blooms July–August.

Size: 16"–20" high x 12" wide; hardy to zone 5.

Campanula sarmatica (P-1171)
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Campanula takesimana  full sun  partial shade
Campanula takesimana Campanula takesimana

If fairies lived in flowers, they would certainly call this Korean Campanula home. White with hints of lilac on the outside and spotted maroon on the inside, the 2 in. lanternlike flowers lighten even the darkest of days. With reddish stems and large deep green basal foliage, this perennial spreads easily and can be grown in full sun on the coast.

Blooms July–September.

Size: 18" high x 2' & spreading; hardy to zone 5.


Campanula takesimana (P-0047)
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Campanula trachelium ‘Bernice’  full sun  partial shade
Campanula trachelium Bernice

Profusions of showy violet-blue flowers, their delicate layers of petals opening widely, embellish strong leafy stems above a neat mound of jagged-edged basal foliage. An excellent choice for the rock garden, tuck ‘Bernice’ in a crevice with gray-leafed Salvia ‘Bee’s Bliss’ nearby.

Blooms June–July.

Size: 18" high x 15" wide; hardy to zone 4.


Campanula trachelium ‘Bernice’ (P-0733)
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Latest News

Straight from the Border: Enjoy autumn splendor in your garden.

Most gardeners experience a bittersweet sense of relief when the light finally shifts, lengthening shadows, shortening the days, and lulling the garden closer to it’s winter nap. Relieved of most of our watering duties, we usually have more time to pour ourselves a favorite beverage and slowly saunter through our leafy havens.

With mindful plant selection, a keen design sense, plus appropriate maintenance earlier in the season, a compelling fall garden will be yours to enjoy! During October and early November, our landscapes can offer extraordinary vignettes that celebrate a dynamic juxtaposition. Imagine brilliantly ignited leaves and stems, fanciful berries and glowing grass inflorescences set against the subdued beauty of diverse seed heads, peeling bark, artful limbs and mocha-hued fading foliage.

If you long for more blossoms later in the season, a mid-summer cut back of many herbaceous late-bloomers guarantees flower-power up until the first heavy frost. Along the same vein, a late spring pruning of tall architectural perennials ensures the longevity of their impressive stature, even as they morph into dormancy. Trimming the early spring flowering perennials that showcase exceptional foliage will keep them looking fresh throughout the fall.

The onset of cooler weather tends to be a good time to contemplate your plantings, taking note of the areas you may like to change. Try not to rush your fall cut-backs, since many spent flower heads as well as persistent fruit nourish the birds, and remember to be on the lookout for wondrous additions to your dried arrangements.

Whether they play a supporting role or act as shining stars, the exceptional plants mentioned in this newsletter promise to delight you with their fantastic late season appeal. Many regions across the country experience a safe fall planting period that extends into early November, so you may wish to dig some of these easily grown gems into your garden and get a head-start on next spring!

Perennials:

  • Anemone x hybrida ‘Alice’
    Unlike many Anemones, ‘Alice’ spreads slowly, growing into a clump 3 ft. across within three years. It is robust and upright with large leaves that outsize the foliage of most hybrida forms. In our garden, the semidouble soft pink flowers appear to float against a hedge of Carpinus and contrast well with the golden fall foliage of Amsonia hubrichtii. Hardy to zone 4. (p-0503)
    anemone

    Anemone x hybrida ‘Alice’

  • Aster lateriflorus ‘White Lovely’
    Calico Aster
    A preeminent star of the fall show, ‘White Lovely’ entertains petite, thin-petaled white daisies tinged lilac when mature and brightened by sunny-side-up yellow eyes. The copious, late summer flowers are borne along horizontally branched leafy sprays of arching and wide-angled, purple-streaked stems with small, slender dark green foliage that never tuckers out. We like to plant Monarda ‘Violet Queen’ and Melianthus ‘Antonow’s Blue’ behind while headlining this elegant Aster right up front. Hardy to zone 4. (P-1366)
  • Aster oblongifolius ‘Raydon’s Favorite’
    Aromatic Aster
    Mr. Raydon Alexander of San Antonio, Texas, said this hearty mint-scented Aster was his favorite, and we’re sure you’ll agree. Originating near Lookout Mountain, Tennessee, drought tolerant ‘Raydon’s Favorite’ quickly forges a valiant, dense mound that gets buried under multitudes of bright blue-lavender daisies. With late richly colored flowers, distinguished by sunlit yellow eyes and fine-textured single rays, and a no-fuss, orderly nature, it proves indispensable in the fall border. Zone 3/4. ‘Raydon’s Favorite’ (P-1611)
    aster

    Aster oblongifolius ‘Raydon’s Favorite’

  • Brunnera macrophylla ‘Jack Frost’
    Awash in a mercury-like effulgence, broad heart-shaped leaves are etched by light green veins creating the most dramatic crackled ceramic pattern. ‘Jack Frost’s highly refined silvered persona offsets bronze, green and gold foliage, while sky-blue flowers add a playful lift. A Walters Gardens’ introduction that originated from a ‘Langtrees’s sport, this Brunnera brings sterling accents to the darker corners of your garden. Hardy to zone 4. (P-1353)
    brunnera

    Brunnera macrophylla ‘Jack Frost’

  • Eupatorium purpureum
    This robust cousin is from the taller side of the family (up to 6 or 7 ft.), and shares the wine red stem coloring of its smaller kin. Eupatorium purpureum features a stately carriage with broad, domed heads hosting purple-mauve flowers. It’s tough, reliable and effective for the back of the border. Hardy to zone 4. (p-1081)
    eupatorium

    Eupatorium purpureum

  • Euphorbia griffithii ‘Great Dixter’
    Renowned garden writer Christopher Lloyd, selected this Euphorbia for its sumptuous display of fiery hues. Heightened by purple coral shoots, reddish bronze stems, dark green foliage flushed with copper-red tints and burnt apricot-pink blooms, ‘Great Dixter’ seldom experiences a lackluster moment. The unforgettable brilliance that emanates from this superb, compact griffithii can be shown to great affect next to Brunnera ‘Langtrees’s soothing colors. Hardy to zone 6. (P-1232)
    euphorbia

    Euphorbia griffithii ‘Great Dixter’ with Calamagrostis foliosa

  • Geranium ‘Orion’
    Named after one of the brightest constellations in Europe’s night sky, this possible ‘Brookside’ seedling extends a shining floral display. Large, saucer-shaped and brilliantly blue flowers enhanced by violet-red veins and luminous whitened centers levitate above a mass of ample, finely dissected greenery. Courtesy of Dutch nurseryman Brian Kabbes, long blooming ‘Orion’ can be partnered with Helianthemum ‘Wisley Pink’ for sparkling color. Hardy to zone 5. (P-1266)
  • Helleborus niger ‘HGC Jonas’
    Promising early winter floral magic, this superbly bred selection boasts a luminous bevy of yellow-stamened crisp white petals atop burgundy stems. Defined by 7 petals, as opposed to the usual 5, and a light green or blush pink coloration as they age, full forward-facing flowers rise from dark green toothed leaves that shape a lustrous evergreen foil. Perfect for holiday decorating, ‘Jonas’ can be enjoyed in bouquets, in a lightly shaded mixed planting or a magnificent container specimen on the patio. Hardy to zone 5. (P-1806)
  • Phlomis russeliana
    With architectural assertiveness, stout straight stems broadcast separate whorls of butter yellow hooded blooms. Maintaining a stalwart beauty throughout the winter, the stalks look equally impressive whether fresh or dried as they stand above large and broad, heart-shaped olive-green leaves. The fuzzy, scalloped foliage develops into a plush low growing, evergreen cover that keeps those pesky weeds at bay.In our garden, Phlomis russeliana casts bold accents along a pathway, assorting with Aster ‘Ringdove’ and Molinias. Hardy to zone 4. (p-1314)
  • Salvia confertiflora
    With velvety, reddish purple stems, smooth, bright green new foliage that matures to a textured dark green, and fuzzy, vermilion flowers, this Brazilian native is lush and tantalizing. Wonderful cut or dried, the 6 to 10 in. long flower spikes make a bold statement in the fall border with Asters and grasses, and combine beautifully with mounding perennials. Hardy to zone 9. (p-0214)
  • Salvia nemorosa ‘Amethyst’
    With the violet-blue tones of the blossoms, and the similar but rosier shades of the enduring calyxes and prominent streaks that mark the leafy upright flower stems, this richly colored Salvia is a jewel. With wavy-edged foliage, this long bloomer exhibits a handsome fullness. Softening the edge of our pathway in the company of Origanum ‘Ed Carmine’, a violet theme is created, while the addition of Kniphofia ‘Border Ballet’ adds a lively splash of melon to the picture. Hardy to zone 5. (p-0813)
  • Salvia uliginosa
    Uliginosa means "of the marshes", in this case those between the forests of southern Brazil and Argentina's fertile pampas. Eye-catching white flecked azure blue flowers soar atop slender branching stems lined with narrow lance-shaped green leaves. A quick-to-establish colonizing perennial, Bog Sage presents an airy, strong and erect habit that doesn't need staking and flourishes in moist niches along streams or ponds and in ordinary garden conditions, even tolerating heavy or dry soil. For a spectacular effect, plant it alongside Anemone 'Andrea Atkinson'. Hardy to zone 6. (P-0997)
  • Saxifraga stolonifera ‘Maroon Beauty’
    Strawberry Begonia
    Named for its slender strawberry-like red runners and flashy maroon undersides, this colonizing Saxifraga hosts intricately etched evergreen rosettes of thick rounded gray-green leaves with scalloped margins, silver hairs and pewter veins. Rising above the low growing velvet soft mat, wispy 5-petaled pink-tinged white flowers are loosely arranged on delicate 18 in. stalks. Appreciative of shade and evenly moist well-drained soil, ‘Maroon Beauty’ lends enchanting accents to the woodlands, rockery or a small container. Hardy to zone 7. (P-1819)
    saxifrage

    Saxifraga stolonifera ‘Maroon Beauty’

  • Selinum wallichianum
    This refined Himalayan beauty happens to be one of our favorite perennial umbellifers. With untold elegance, infinitely divided leaves craft a delicate, lacelike transparency. The compact yet airy green canopy is framed by distinctive, purple-infused branching stems that elevate a charming, late season display of white flattened umbels. Subduing the riotous array of summertime blooms, it seldom needs staking, appreciates a well draining moist niche and can be sited amid Filipendula rubra ‘Venusta’ and Echinacea Big Sky ‘Sunrise’. Hardy to zone 7. (p-1406)
  • Sedum telephium ‘Karfunkelstein’
    Fancied as one of the rising stars at the 2006 RHS Sedum Trials, this exceptional Ernest Pagels prodigy has a dainty demeanor. Copious rose red buds and small dusky pink flower heads crest a close-knit sea of upright multibranched green stems infused with lavish beet red shades. Ideal for gardens where space is scarce, the short stalwart stalks never flop and are clad in toothed gray-green spoon-shaped leaves with slate purple overtones, heightening ‘Karfunkelstein’s prismatic presentation. Hardy to zone 4. (P-1717)
  • Verbena bonariensis
    Brazilian Vervain
    A celebrated perennial whose fans include both experienced gardeners and novices, and florists and hummingbirds, this versatile South American native delivers outstanding flower power. Rough, lance-shaped dark green basal foliage gives way to wiry and sparsely leafed angular-branching stems, which elevate a consortium of tiny lavender violet blooms. With fragrant flowers borne in dense tufts atop its airy profile, Brazilian Vervain brings a colorful carefree look to cottage gardens or more wild venues, especially when paired with ornamental grasses. Hardy to zone 7. (P-1720)
  • Yucca dismetiana ‘Blue Boy’
    Dressed in gray icy greens and powder blues with a dusky purple overlay, this handsome pastel-hued treasure exhibits a tough disposition. Rigid evergreen leaves with sharp pointed tips and fine-toothed margins craft a rounded barrel-like rosette that develops slowly, its amethyst coloration intensifying as the weather heats up. Waxy white pendulous flowers draped on stout panicles deliver late summer sparkle. Unfazed by mettlesome deer, drought, moisture and humidity, ‘Blue Boy’ can harmonize with Melianthus ‘Antonow’s Blue’ and Festuca ‘Superba’. Zone 7/8. (P-1495)
    yucca

    Yucca purpurea

Grasses:

grasses

Grasses and hornbeam columns

  • Andropogon gerardii
    Big Bluestem
    Historically renowned as the sod our ancestors broke their backs busting, Big Bluestem is the most widespread of all the prairie grasses. Its regal and wild color show makes it a must in our garden. Growing to great size, the stand’s lush, blue-blushed summer greenery becomes a burgundy and copper glory at first frost. Soaring three-pronged red seed heads beg its other common name, Turkeyfoot. Reliable, heat tolerant and sturdy, Andropogon gerardii thrives in poorly drained clay to dry sandy soils, and easily transitions the outskirts of your garden into the wild meadow beyond. Hardy to zone 4. (g-0448)
  • Calamagrostis x acutiflora ‘Karl Foerster’
    Karl Foerster’s Feather Reed Grass
    Named for pioneering German nurseryman Karl Foerster, this selection bears loose and airy 12 in. seed heads, which tighten to slender plumes by midsummer. Rising above 2 ft. clumps of narrow green foliage, the inflorescences create an ideal semitransparent veiling effect. Plant with deep green Viburnums to accentuate its golden flowering stems. Hardy to zone 5. (g-0003)
  • Eragrostis chloromelas
    Blue Lovegrass
    Witness the ethereal haze of sheer amber-colored panicles floating on lax 3 ft. stalks over long fine cut powdery blue blades and you'll see why we love this gorgeous South African denizen. The flowing warm season mound spreads slowly over time, while the gauzy inflorescences tantalize birds, butterflies and the rest of us through early winter. Appreciative of fast draining locations, Blue Lovegrass makes a sterling drought tolerant specimen or mass planting. Flank with Pennisetum spathiolatum and tall Molinias, and intersperse Sanguisorba ‘Chocolate Tip’ or Aster ‘Blue Danube’ for a spectacular painterly effect. Zone 6/7. (G-0540)
    eragrastis

    Eragrostis chloromelas

  • Hakonechloa macra ‘Beni-kaze’
    With the same overflowing grace as its relatives, newly introduced ‘Beni-kaze’ entertains brilliant red fall colors. The lax green mound of loosely arranged, draped blades remains green until cooler weather ignites the smooth foliar ribbons and begs its name, which translates “red wind.” Lolling in the late season shadows, this larger growing Hakonechloa echoes the warm-hued fanfare of autumnal foliage. Hardy to zone 6. (G-0497)
  • Miscanthus sinensis ‘Positano’
    A graceful standout, ‘Positano’ warms the fall landscape with sunkissed colors. Large, red, glistening plumes are cast well above the impressive upright fountain of arching, fine textured blades. Etched by pewter midribs, the foliage grows in a sophisticated crisscross pattern and when fall arrives, transmutes toasty reds and oranges. Revered grass aficionado Ernst Pagels raised this clump-forming cultivar whose first-class profile and rich hues can accentuate Rudbeckia ‘Goldquelle’ and Helianthus ‘Capenoch Star’. Hardy to zone 5. (G-0491)
  • Pennisetum spathiolatum
    Slender Veldt Grass
    A denizen of South Africa, this drought tolerant evergreen grass has low growing, narrow dark green blades that provide a verdant contrast to its tawny colored tapers. The dense, abundantly produced inflorescences hover on jointed nearly invisible stems, some 2 to 3 ft. tall, while fashioning a delightful see-through veil. Especially mesmerizing when grouped in a dry creek bed, a meadow or a water wise garden, the Slender Veldt Grass asks only for a well drained abode. Zone 6/7. (G-0511)
    pennisetum sesleria hydrangea

    Pennisetum spathiolatum (back), Sesleria ‘Greenlee’ (front) and Hydrangea paniculata

  • Sesleria ‘Greenlee’
    John Greenlee’s Moor Grass
    Exhibiting attributes from both parents, this tidy looking evergreen, discovered by grass aficionado John Greenlee, is thought to be a hybrid between Sesleria caerulea and Sesleria autumnalis. Blue-tinged green blades bear a likeness to Sesleria cearulea’s, but are longer, while the blooms resemble those of Sesleria autumnalis, except for being thicker, more elongated and for turning a purplish brown hue when mature. Topped by reflective green inflorescences with creamy yellow pollen sacs, thin stems rise well above the versatile upright clump that maintains its composure through a multitude of exposures such as sun, shade, moisture, heat or drought. ‘Greenlee’ renders a sprightly verdant statement whether massed in a meadow or a more formal setting. Zone 6/7. (G-0525)

Shrubs:

  • Aronia melanocarpa ‘Iroquois Beauty’
    A versatile North American native originating in Morton Arboretum, this small-statured deciduous shrub proposes something exceptional for each season: fragrant spring flowers, courtly summer foliage, brilliant fall color and persistent winter berries. Flaunting an autumnal pageant of stunning red, burgundy and purple hues, lustrous, deeply green, thickened leaves garb the compact, dense multitude of suckering stems. Airy, Hawthorne-like flowers gathered in white, 2 in. wide, eye catching corymbs precede the heavy clusters of polished purple-black berries that gracefully weigh down branches and bring color to gray December days. Obliging of low-lying wet areas, dry sandy sites and some shade, easy-to-grow ‘Iroquois Beauty’ thrives in full sun and can reside with equal ease in a small garden, a mixed border or a naturalized setting when planted en masse. Hardy to zone 3. (S-0600)
    pennisetum sesleria hydrangea

    Aronia melanocarpa ‘Iroquois Beauty’

  • Callicarpa dichotoma ‘Early Amethyst’
    Purple Beautyberry
    A beacon for the fall border, this deciduous Korean species is considered by many to be the most refined Beautyberry, and its boldly hued early September fruit occurs well before other varieties. Small and shiny, rounded berry clusters achieve an astonishing, almost electric lavender hue. Flowers are delicate, diminutive and pink, quietly dressing up its handsome, very green leaf mass and gracefully rounded form. ‘Early Amethyst’ prefers well drained soil, tolerates some drought, appreciates a late winter pruning and produces more fruit when planted in groups. Hardy to zone 5. (S-0587)
  • Escallonia laevis ‘Gold Brian’
    Spangled with incandescent, gleaming golden foliage and terminal panicles of long blooming raspberry-colored flowers, this drop-dead gorgeous evergreen shrub promises to delight you throughout the seasons. The dashing medium-sized rounded leaves are leathery and toothed, transmuting fresh lime-green shades during the summer. Acquiescent to salt spray and varied soil conditions, even dry ones, ‘Gold Brian’s bushy hard-to-miss visage demands a well-drained abode, a trim immediately after the blossoms are spent and protection from hot afternoon sun. Zone 7/8. (S-0759)
    escallonia

    Escallonia laevis ‘Gold Brian’

  • Hydrangea quercifolia ‘Snow Queen’
    Though its name might make you think otherwise, this shrub is a showcase of earth tones. Its 8 in. long panicles of white flowers, which later take on a pinkish hue, stand out like snow against the beautiful cinnamon-brown, exfoliating bark and the large dark green Oak-like leaves that turn reddish purple in autumn. Hardy and undemanding, ’Snow Queen’ offers a fantastic fall display full of similar colors and contrasting forms when matched with Panicum ‘Warrior’. Hardy to zone 5. (S-0201)
  • Hydrangea paniculata ‘Unique’
    Left to its own designs, this vigorous Hydrangea has a natural upright and arching form, but it also responds well to pruning, making ‘Unique’ an effective choice where space is scarce. The immense flower heads are spectacular and abundant, and true to name are unique in shape, being quite broad at the base and bluntly rounded at the tip. They begin the season a creamy white and gradually darken to a buff pink. Hardy to zone 3. (s-0348)
    hydrangea

    Hydrangea paniculata ‘Unique’

  • Leycesteria formosa ‘Golden Lanterns’
    A newly introduced English cultivar, ‘Golden Lanterns’ has the same tantalizing attributes as the species but with an illuminated twist. Dark burgundy bracts and berries become intriguing counterpoints to amber-tinted new growth and the lambent yellow-green foliage that promises to brighten your daytime, or even moonlight garden stroll. Zone 6/7. (S-0609)
    leysteria

    Leycesteria formosa ‘Golden Lanterns’

  • Viburnum plicatum f tomentosum ‘Summer Snowflake’
    The most exceptional attribute of this deciduous Viburnum is its horizontal growth habit, featuring flowers and fruit in parallel rows along the branches. Distinguished by a smaller stature, and foliage that’s not quite as large as Viburnum ‘Shasta’, ‘Summer Snowflake’ maintains a more rounded form and blooms well into summer with an extravagant offering of pure white lacecap flowers. It’s lovely in containers, grouped in a drift, or as a star specimen. Hardy to zone 5. (S-0075)

Trees:

  • Chionanthus retusus
    Chinese Fringe Tree
    Named for its clustered, snow-white fleecy flowers, the broadly spreading Chinese Fringe Tree casts light shade with rounded leathery leaves. This deciduous Olive family member is a captivating, four season specimen displaying blue, egg-shaped summer fruit, warm yellow autumn foliage and peeling gray-brown bark in winter. Well sized for a lawn or small yard, it’s easily cultivated in moist, loamy soil. Grows slowly. Hardy to zone 5. (T-0008)
  • Cornus capitata
    Evergreen Dogwood
    An elegant, large evergreen shrub or small tree, this slow growing Dogwood is a perfect anchor for the shrubby border. Handsome, curved leathery leaves with light green veins provide a pleasing texture and turn bronze in the winter months. Buttonlike flower heads surrounded by creamy yellow bracts precede the long lasting, prominent, pinkish red strawberry-shaped fruit that appears in November and can be brought inside as a colorful complement to holiday greenery. Hardy to zone 8. (S-0364)
    dogwood

    Cornus capitata

  • Parrotia persica
    Persian Ironwood
    F. W. Parrot, who made the first ascent of Mt. Ararat in 1829, lends his name to this low branched, round headed, deciduous Persian native with tremendous landscape value. In spring, the silver, green and cream-colored smooth bark is complemented by lustrous green foliage and in autumn it’s highlighted by exquisite gold, rosy pink and crimson tones. Later, showy red stamens and wooly brown bracts create a reddish haze around bare limbs, making a virtual carousel of color and texture. Pest free Persian Ironwood prefers well drained soil and detests both overly wet or dry conditions. Grows moderately. 10’ in 6–8 yrs. Hardy to zone 5. (T-0016)

Current Staff’s Favorite Plant

staff favorite plant

We love Correa ‘Dusky Bells’ for it’s dainty red tubular flowers that are sprinkled amongst waxy green leaves, becoming one of winter’s more endearing attractions. The dainty long lasting blooms appear in autumn and persist through early spring, luring both gardeners and hummingbirds alike. Whether utilized as a low mounding specimen in a large vessel or as a tidy evergreen ground cover for banks, hillsides or other tough spots, the Red Australian Fuchsia favors good drainage and light shade where it’s hot. This densely branched shrub is undaunted by deer, ocean frontage, poor rocky sites, and occasional drought. Affiliate with other steadfast companions like Ceanothus ‘Concha’ and Stipa arundinacea. (S-0735)

More news, events, and favorite plants


Customer Comment:

“I just wanted to let you know that all the plants I ordered from you have arrived in wonderful condition.  Thank you very much.”

~Diana in Louisiana


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