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Hardiness Zone Map


Monarda

Wild Bergamot/Beebalm

This genus was named after Dr. Nicolas Monardes, a Spanish physician whose Joyfull Newes Out of the New Founde Worlde was the first book to be published about the flora of the Americas. A summer-blooming member of the Mint family, everything about this plant is intriguing. Excellent in arrangements, its jaunty whorled blossoms and decorative bracts attract butterflies and hummingbirds, while holding our interest even in winter. Lining erect and robust stems, the opposite leaves are deliciously fragrant. An engaging addition to the border or a meadow setting, Bergamot offers pleasing contrast to the more undefined forms of the garden, as well as to the linear aspect of grasses. Happiest in moist fertile soil, Monarda’s dense clump needs to be divided every 2 to 3 years. The following cultivars exhibit outstanding resistance to powdery mildew.

A central U.S. inhabitant, this superlative small-statured Monarda champions some admirable traits: early-blooming flowers, deer and mildew resistance plus a well-behaved slow spreading habit. Short steadfast stems forge a clump characterized by spiffy aromatic grayish green foliage plus grand, dense pinkish lavender globes of purple speckled 2-lipped flowers, which reside upon violet-infused leafy bracts. Captivating bees and butterflies, the festooned flowers sustain their intrigue as they morph into dried seed heads.

Blooms May|ndash;July

Size: 12" – 2' 0" high x 12" – 2' 0" wide.

Hardy to zone 4.

Celebrating a sassy mop of brilliant coral pink blooms, this new must-have selection comes from the Morden Breeding Program in Manitoba, Canada. ‘Coral Reef’s whorled Salvia-like flowers sport prominent green centers and green bracts, while its tidy, more compact habit is similar to ‘Marshall’s Delight’.

Slightly polished dark green foliage sets off the hot floral presentation that can be sprinkled near Penstemon ‘Blue Midnight’ and Eryngium ‘Big Blue’ for an energetic combination. (pp#16,741)

Blooms June – August.

Size: 2-1/2' – 3' 0" high x 15" wide.

Zone 3/4.

Monarda didyma ‘Jacob Cline’ (P-1126)

Each $8.50

AVAILABLE LATE SEPTEMBER 2019

<i>Monarda didyma</i> ‘Jacob Cline’ <i>Monarda didyma</i> ‘Jacob Cline’

Deemed by many gardeners to be “the best red,” this showy Monarda was discovered way down south growing along Georgia’s Blue Ridge Parkway. Cloaked in vivid deep green leaves, its tall firm stems stage a blazon display of large, tufted red flowers lodged on leafy maroon bracts. 

Blooms late June|#8211;September

Size: 4' 0" – 5' 0" high x 15" wide.

Zone 3/4.

The prodigal offspring of two top performing Beebalms, ‘Marshalls Delight’ and ‘Jacob Cline’, this Dr. Jim Ault introduction swaggers enormous shaggy flower heads stained in red and ruddy pink tones hoisted atop stout stems. Natty green foliage cloaks the medium-sized frame that is commended for its topnotch mildew resistance. A show-off beacon in sunny mixed borders, meadow plantings or prairie-style venues, ‘Fire Marshall’ galvanizes garden visitors and hummingbirds alike. (pp#23,286)

Blooms June–August

Size: 4' 0" – 3' 0" high x 15" – 2' 0" wide.

Hardy to zone 4.

Developed by an agricultural breeding program in Morden, Manitoba, this exceptional new introduction volunteers plenty of large, shaggy vivid-hued fuchsia-purple blooms above a midsized highly mildew-resistant foundation. The nectar-rich, perfect-for-cutting flowers entice all sorts of pollinators, while attractive pointed dark green leaves waft a mint aroma. Best grown in fertile moisture-retentive soil, ‘Grand Marshall’ can grace a perennial border, cottage garden or meadow-like planting with Phlox and Molinia. (PP#19,582)

Blooms June–August

Size: 2' 0" – 2-1/2' high x 10" – 15" wide.

Hardy to zone 3.

<i>Monarda punctata</i>

Pollinators flock by the droves to unique, painterly whorled rosettes of yellowish, purple-speckled tubular flowers and large, pointed pale mauve and pink leaf-like bracts, which adorn the dense elongated spikes. Indigenous to the eastern U.S. from Long Island to Florida, Spotted Horsemint is an upright multistemmed perennial with sturdy violet-tinged stalks and toothed, tea-worthy oblong leaves, smelling like oregano. This marvelous deer-resistant native lends showy accents to bouquets, borders and butterfly gardens, where it craves sharp-draining sandy soil plus good air circulation and generally reseeds since it may be somewhat short-lived.

Blooms jJune|ndash;July

Size: 18" – 2' 0" high x 9" – 12" wide.

Hardy to zone 4.

Selected from a patch of didyma seedlings, this richly hued 2009 introduction by David Nedvect of the Flower Factory reflects his fondness for roosters. ‘Purple Rooster’ clearly lives up to its name, strutting large long-blooming flowers bathed in the truest royal-purple shades imaginable. The hard-to-beat floral splendor holds court atop staunch stems that are lined with clean mildew-resistant, mint-scented foliage.

Blooms June-August

Size: 3' 0" high x 18" – 2' 0" wide.

Hardy to zone 4.

Awarded top honors at a recent Chicago Botanical Garden trial that included nearly 40 other Monarda varieties, ‘Raspberry Wine’ will be a winner in your garden as well. Its upright stand of strong leafy stems gives way to long blooming flowers flaunting fanciful tops, each delicately perfumed and saturated with vibrant wine-red hues.

Blooms June – August.

Size: 2-1/2' – 3' 0" high x 15" wide.

Zone 3/4.

Crowning red-tinged bracts, this Monarda’s vivid lavender-violet flowers will reign in your garden. Its downy soft, grayish green foliage makes a pleasing, fragrant base for the colorful and curved, tubular blooms.

Blooms June – August.

Size: 2-1/2' – 3' 0" high x 15" wide.

Zone 3/4.

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Current Staff's Favorite Plant

Current Staff's Favorite Plant

Our featured plant: Crocosmia x crocosmiiflora ‘Honey Angels’

Colorful Crocosmias, Be Awed by your August garden, Saturday Strolls!

Click here to view our Late August 2019 Newsletter!

Colorful Crocosmias!

Crocosmias pack a punch of late summer color as our gardens transition into autumn. Their clustered tubular flowers populate the ends of gracefully arching spikes, which emerge from handsome sword-like foliage. Ranging from yellow, peach and orange to fiery red, their prismatic shades look exceptional with white flowering perennials such as Phlox ‘David’, Selinum wallichianum and Aster ‘Bridal Veil’, as well as the blue blossoms of Aconitum, Agapanthus ‘Storm Cloud’ or Aster ‘Twilight’. For fun you could create a hot border, blending them with Kniphofia, Helenium, Salvia and even other Crocosmia, plus be sure to include some in your next bouquet. Commonly referred to as Montbretia and hardy to Zone 6, they appreciate, good drainage, adequate water and some shade in scorching summer sun. Please feel free to check out our extensive collection of Crocosmia cultivars in the perennial section of our online catalog.

YES, it’s possible to be in awe of your late August garden….

At this point in the season, some areas in our gardens may appear a tad worn or lackluster. If you haven’t already done so, you may wish to cut back a few tired looking perennials, such as the Nepetas or Geraniums, so you can enjoy a fresh flourish of growth plus more blooms. Adequate moisture and an additional application of compost will also ensure late summer vigor. Incorporating plants that provide a bounty of flowers and alluring leaves in August and September helps buoy our spirits, and hopefully even inspire a little awe as we approach fall. Though the plants featured in this newsletter either promote a bold statement or possess more refined aspects, they equally caught my eye and made me pause to take a closer look. Perhaps they’ll spark a wondrous moment for you as well. All of us Digging Dog plant wranglers wish you Happy Digging!

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