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New Plant
New/Featured for 2021

Full Sun
Full Sun

Partial Shade
Partial Shade

Shade Lover
Full Shade

Drought Tolerant
Drought Tolerant

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Picture Available

Drawing Available
Drawing Available

(PPAF) = Propagation of this plant prohibited without a license.

Hardiness Zone Map


Andropogon

This large cosmopolitan genus gleans its name from the Greek word pogon, or beard, alluding to the lustrous hairs that blanket the inflorescences. Closely associated with Schizachyrium, 13 clump-forming warm season Andropogon hail from North America. Many of the garden-worthy Beardgrass are often drought tolerant, and generally characterized by attractive, easily grown sturdy demeanors, late summer blooms plus prismatic autumn color.

<i>Andropogon gerardii</i>

Historically renowned as the sod our ancestors broke their backs busting, Big Bluestem is the most widespread of all the prairie grasses. Its regal and wild color show makes it a must in our garden. Growing to great size, the stand’s lush, blue-blushed summer greenery becomes a burgundy and copper glory at first frost. Soaring three-pronged red seed heads beg its other common name, Turkeyfoot.

Reliable, heat tolerant and sturdy, Andropogon gerardii thrives in poorly drained clay to dry sandy soils, and easily transitions the outskirts of your garden into the wild meadow beyond.

Blooms late August–October

Size: 5' 0" – 8' 0" high x 3' 0" wide.

Hardy to zone 4.

<i>Andropogon gerardii</i> ‘Lord Snowden’s Big Blue’

Spotted near Crowley, TX by John Snowden, acclaimed grass expert and Bluestem Nursery founder, this American native’s unwavering fortitude belies its graceful lush-looking silhouette. Thick, straight bluish mauve-hued stalks supporting narrow, 3-pronged rubescent inflorescences emerge from large, upright ¼ in. wide powder-blue blades, which broadcast reddish purple, dusky-pink, tangerine and copper tones in September. A carefree color-rich candidate for dry sunny locales, ‘Lord Snowden’ can be massed or planted as a specimen, and associated with Astrantia ‘White Giant’ and Gaura ‘So White’.

Blooms August–November

Size: 5' 0" – 7' 0" high x 4' 0" wide.

Hardy to zone 3.

‘Rain Dance’s calling card is the medley of red, maroon and scarlet hues radiating from its versatile workhorse persona. Burgundy-tipped deep green leaves unleash numerous rubescent stems topped with upright, prismatic reddish purple bloom spikes plus scarlet pollen sacs. Favored by songbirds, flower arrangers and plant aficionados, the long-lasting inflorescences sashay above a stalwart, loosely arranged clump that turns completely red when cooler weather arrives, and in tandem they bestow a gorgeous richly hued fall display. (pp#26,284)

 

Blooms August–October

Size: 5' 0" – 6' 0" high x 2' 0" wide.

Hardy to zone 3.

<i>Andropogon gerardii</i> ‘Red October’

This recent Intrinsic Perennial Garden introduction is quickly earning kudos for its spectacular shades of red and long-lived amenable character. August brings cardinal-red accents to lush dark green blades that define a substantial straight-up clump, while unique 3-branched inflorescences with bright red pollen sacs roost above. Boasting fiery scarlet-red and purple hues by the first frost, aptly named ‘Red October’ furnishes welcome cover for nesting birds and makes a galvanizing addition to a mixed planting, meadow garden or naturalized space.  (PPAF)

Blooms July–October

Size: 5' 0" – 6' 0" high x 2' 0" wide.

Hardy to zone 3.

A more refined, compact form of the variable southeastern native, this winning, tough-as-nails cultivar was recently selected by North Carolina Arboretum Curator Terry Dalton. Initially spotted at his fifth-generation farm near Black Mountain, N.C., its upright, glaucous blue-green base looks similar to both Andropogon virginicus and Schizachyrium scoparium, though its pearlescent floral display is singular. Green flowering stalks develop maroon hues and slim stems, which jut out, affording bird-friendly, tuft-like spikelets with sparkling silvery white hairs plus a wondrous glimmering halo. Ideal for a well-drained, midborder position, Split Bluestem’s tidy, low growing habit hosts purple, copper and red fall leaves and tackles drought, but sulks in overly wet soil.

Blooms mid-August–October

Size: 2-1/2' – 3' 0" high x 15" – 18" wide.

Hardy to zone 6.

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Current Staff's Favorite Plant

Current Staff's Favorite Plant

Our featured plant: Athyrium ‘Ghost’

Feathery-fine ferns, Refresh your summer border, Summer Shipping!

Characterized by delicate-looking fronds...

the deer-proof ferns, which are featured above, unfurl spritely new fiddleheads every spring. All are deciduous save for the lustrous Polystichum, otherwise known as Tassel Fern. Varying shades of green, metallic silver, russet, bronze and burgundy imbue their artful foliage. Second-to-none for shady alcoves, these easy-care perennials can be planted as specimens or grouped in shade gardens, mixed borders and woodland settings. Their filigree-fine features lend sophisticated accents to patio containers or cut arrangements. Ferns will flourish in cool , well-drained moist nooks enriched with compost or well-rotted manure.  

Refresh your summer plantings...

During the month of July, gardeners sometimes wonder how they can perk up their summer gardens. Sunshine-hued blooms, golden leaves and crisp white flowers lend lively accents. They can be sprinkled amid a mixed border, perennial bed or other plantings, melding well with flowers that include a broad color spectrum from blue-violet to purple and lilac, as well as clear pink and darker rose hues.  

Apart from adding more plants, there are a few simple maintenance techniques that will help your garden maintain a fresh appearance during the summer. The addition of a chipped-bark mulch or well-rotted compost early in the season, not only reduces water requirements throughout the warmer months, but promotes vigorous growth and peppy-looking foliage. Many perennials, such as Nepetas and Geraniums, can be trimmed in June or July. This midseason cut back ensures a tidy stature and more blooms, often all the way ‘til frost.

We hope some of the plants in this newsletter spark some interest and beckon you to dig them into that empty spot in your garden.  

 

 

 

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